Fun creative writing ideas for high school

We learn and we improve, yet we often slip up and make common mistakes. These mistakes are so common that everyone is tired of them, no one mentions them anymore.

Fun creative writing ideas for high school

Contact Author Are you struggling to keep your creative writing classes new and interesting? Instead of working with traditional exercises that focus on plot outlines, point of view, and setting, give your students some challenges that will force them to really use their imaginations—and maybe even fuel a little friendly competition.

Here are ten exercises and projects that you can try adding into your classes to put some of the fun back into your classroom: Start a pseudonym project. A lot of student writers—especially younger students—are very shy about sharing their writing with their peers.

Many hold back from writing anything too personal or passionate when they know someone else will see it and might even say something negative about it. To give new writers a sense of safety, try adding some anonymity. Have students privately pick a pseudonym that they will use for all of their assignments.

This way, students Fun creative writing ideas for high school feel comfortable having their writing read and critiqued without worrying that any comments or judgments are personal.

You can also add an element of competition to this project, if you like.

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Encourage them to mix it up by picking a second pseudonym and writing two pieces for each assignment, finding an ally and switching pseudonyms, or completely changing their writing style to throw their peers off the scent.

At the end of the semester or year, have everyone submit their guesses and find out who was who. If anyone managed to keep their pseudonym without being found out, award them with bonus points.

Create an on-running class story. This can be a way to get your students comfortable with each other and to keep the ideas flowing when they feel stuck on their own writing.

At the beginning of the semester, write the premise of a very simple story for your students. For example, it could be something like: Dan likes Michelle, but Michelle is in love with George.

Maybe Michelle goes out with Dan to make George jealous, but then Dan dumps her when he finds out. Then, George confesses that the person he has feelings for is actually Dan.

To make it even more fun and challenging, give your students requirements they have to fulfill every time they collaborate on a new scene. For example, there has to be a fight and somebody has to spill coffee all over their favorite outfit. Or, an element of fantasy has to be included. Pick whatever you like, and see what your class comes up with.

Working together to plot a story can help students learn from each other's strengths as writers. Split your class into teams of students and assign them a writing prompt.

Begin with one student from each group writing on their own. After 5 minutes, have them stop wherever they are mid-sentence, whatever and pass off the paper to the next member of the group. Continue with this drill either for a set period of time or until the groups are all finished writing their scenes.

This is a great exercise for encouraging students to broaden their skill set as writers. Ask them to bring in a poem, short story, or novel from a writer they admire. Next, ask them to write their own poem or paragraph about whatever they want.

Does the author use unusual imagery, or perhaps excel at realistic dialogue? What is it that makes their characters so realistic, or their descriptions so vivid? Do some art writing.

Bring a collection of random snapshots, posters, and photos of famous artwork to class with you. Have students choose randomly from your pile and ask them to write a scene based off what they see.

Give them a mix to make it diverse and interesting. For example, one photo might include a group of friends sitting around a campfire. Another might be a photo of a building, or painting of a flower with no people in it at all.

Maybe their character painted the flower, or maybe their character is the flower.Why make writing fun? Research consistently shows that children learn more when they are actively engaged in the learning process and having fun. 2 WEEKS OF FREE BELL RINGERS Have your students in their seat when the bell rings!

Here are 365 Creative Writing Prompts to Inspire:

Begin each of your middle or high school English classes with these engaging daily bell ringer routines! Do you have students that say, "I don't know what to write about!"?

Do you need activities for your classroom writing station?

Fun creative writing ideas for high school

These creative and fun writing prompts will inspire students to get writing! Perfect for journal writing, writing center, or. Note that there is a major overlap between mid-level and high school.

Home School Ideas

That's because the distinction is often muddled in terms of interest, development, etc. High School (Grades ) Higher Education Go make your own prompts ;) Powered by Create your own unique website with customizable templates.

Group Creative Writing Exercises. These exercises can be used in the classroom, at writing groups or in workshops, or you can use them if you want to practice creative writing with your friends.

Creative Writing, Page 3 Creative Writing and Storytelling Ideas A variety of links to ideas and handouts for all grade levels. Sacred Cows for High School Creative Writing Students This unit uses stories and information about animals to discuss various themes that deal with human behavior.

It includes a wide variety of mentor texts.

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